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Women's Canada-2015 World Cup: A great example of the substantial growth in football

Women's Canada-2015 World Cup: A great example of the substantial growth in football

 

Women's Canada-2015 World Cup will mark a before and after in the world of women's football: 24 teams will play for the first time in six venues, with television coverage never seen before in this sport.
 
All this only serves to highlight the rise of women's football in the world, whose relevance is increasingly rising in the global scene.
 
Not surprisingly, today, there are nearly 140 women's teams while in 1997 there were only 60.  The number more than doubled in less than 20 years, a boom which started in the late 1990s and early millennium.
 
Notably, in Pasadena, California (USA) 90, 185 spectators were in attendance at the Rose Bowl stadium, in 1999, to witness the final of the US Women's World Cup between the local team and China.
 
- An unstoppable growth -
 
The first Women's World Cup was held in 1991.  At that time, 45 teams from around the World played in the qualifying stages.  In 2015, that number had tripled, reaching 128 national teams looking for a place in order to play at the World Cup in Canada.
 
Nobody wanted to miss this tournament, in which Ecuador, Costa Rica, Spain, Cameroon, Ivory Coast, Netherlands, Switzerland and Thailand will debut.
 
The tournament will also be made available through unprecedented television coverage: with 22 cameras and next generation ultra-high definition broadcast.
 
"FIFA expects hundreds of millions of fans around the world to tune in to see the Women's World Cup in Canada.  This is the biggest broadcast production we have ever invested for women's football," said Niclas Ericson , Director of FIFA TV, the official website of the organization.
 
"This shows the commitment by FIFA with its development and promotion, and also reflects its tremendous momentum and the interest in today's women's football around the globe," he added.
 
And do not forget that nearly 63 million people around the world saw  in 2011 the World Cup in Japan, in which Germany won against the United States in the final in a penalty shootout.
 
- Videogame Football Stars -
 
FIFA also announced on May 28th that the 2016 edition of the popular game from EA Sports that bears its name with 12 national teams will include the female teams for the first time in its history.
 
In this way, the players will jump from field onto the screen, where they can face each other or their male peers.
 
"It is important for women's football to be in a game to the likes of FIFA's EA Sports," admitted Spaniard captain, Veronica Boquete, whose national team will appear in this upcoming Cup along with Brazil, Mexico, Canada, China, Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Australia, Sweden and the United States.
 
"It's amazing all the science and technology that goes into these vidiogames, let alone the fact that we put on these motion control suits, it's like being in the game itself," said American star Abby Wambach.
 
"We were excited to see our teams in the game, but even more excited to see the reaction of all the fans, including supporters of our team who possibly did not expect something like this from EA SPORTS," she added.